UMass Amherst

Department of Computer Science
 

Computer Science Course Descriptions for Fall of 2003

CMPSCI 105: Computer Literacy (R2)

Professor: Verts

Microcomputers are now used widely in all areas of modern life. For this reason it's important that all students understand how computers work and how computers can be used as a problem-solving tool. The focus of this course is on computer applications. The course stresses the ways in which computers can help you solve problems efficiently and effectively. The course provides a broad introduction to hardware, software, and mathematical aspects of computers. Then four application areas are discussed: word processing, spreadsheets, databases and telecommunications (access to the Internet). Weekly lab assignments are an integral part of the course. Students in lectures A1, 2A, D1, D2, D3, X use the University's microcomputer labs, all other students are expected to use their own equipment. Students who are more interested in computer programming should take CMPSCI 121 or 187. Prerequisites: reasonable high school math skills. Typing ability is also an important asset for the course. Previous computer experience is not expected. Pre-registration is not available to majors and pre-majors. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 105D: Computer Literacy (R2)

Professor: Verts

CMPSCI 105E: Computer Literacy (R2)

Professor: Verts

CMPSCI 105F: Computer Literacy (R2)

Professor: Verts

CMPSCI 120: Introduction to Problem Solving with the Internet (R2)

Professor: Dickson

The Internet is a goldmine of information and software resources for those who know how to plug in and navigate it. Originally designed by computer scientists for computer scientists, the net is now a driving force behind life in the information age and a new global economy. This course will provide non-CMPSCI majors with timely skills needed to tap the net. We will cover Web browser features, e-mail management, Web page design, software downloads, strategies for finding information and virtual communities, and public key cryptography. In addition, we will survey key social and political topics that are relevant to the Internet, such as copyright laws, First Amendment issues, privacy in a digital world, and the culture of the Internet. Prerequisites: some hands-on experience with PCs or MACs or UNIX (programming experience is NOT required). CMPSCI majors and pre-majors may not pre-register. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 121: Introduction to Problem Solving with Computers (R2)

Professor: Lehnert, Eliot

An introductory course in problem solving and computer programming using the programming language Java. The course focuses on the fundamental concepts of problem solving and the techniques associated with the development of algorithms and their implementation as computer programs. This course or its equivalent is required for all additional courses in CMPSCI. Three hours of lecture/recitation per week. About 6 programming projects are assigned. In addition there are assigned homework problems, a midterm exam and a final. No computer science prerequisite, although basic math skills (e.g. R1) and basic computer literacy (as taught in CMPSCI 105) are assumed. There will be a computer literacy exam during the first week to assess your general computer competence. Use of computer is required. Prerequisite: R1. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 121H: Introduction to Problem Solving with Computers (R2)

Professor: Lehnert, Eliot

See description for CMPSCI 121. Honors students will cover some additional topics beyond the curriculum for CMPSCI 121, and will be required to complete one additional programming project. Previous experience with Java or some other programming language is strongly recommended but is not required. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 145: Representing, Storing and Retrieving Information

Professor: Verts

An introductory course in the use of data in computer systems, a core course for the Information Technology certificate. Formats for representing text, numbers, sound, images, etc., as strings of bits. Equations of lines and courves, modeling of synthetic scenes (i.e., ray tracing), exploring the frequency domain and holography. Basic information theory, use and limitations of file compression and encryption. Structured databases and how to use them. Information retrieval in heterogenous environments such as the Web. XML as a language for defining new formats for representing data. Review of historical, pre-computer methods of information representation. Prerequisites: "Basic computer literacy", i.e., user-level familiarity with a modern operating system and some experience with application programs. Tier I math skills. Recommended for First Year and Sophomore Non-Majors. Prerequisite: R1. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 187: Programming with Data Structures (R2)

Professor: Moll

The course introduces and develops methods for designing and implementing abstract data types using the Java programming language. The main focus is on how to build and encapsulate data objects and their associated operations. Specific topics include linked structures, recursive structures and algorithms, binary trees, balanced trees, and hash tables. There will be weekly assignments, consisting of programming and written exercises, a midterm, and a final exam. Prerequisites: CMPSCI 121 (or equivalent-not necessarily in Java) and Basic Math Skills (R1). Basic Java language concepts are introduced quickly. Prior experience with an object-oriented language is very helpful; if unsure of background, contact instructor. 4 credits.

CMPSCI 191A: CMPSCI TAP Seminar

Professor: Wileden

Conversations with members of the UMass CMPSCI community, to explore issues in and subareas of computer science. Oral presentations by students on topics they research. Open only to first-year students in the CMPSCI TAP residential program. 1 credit.

CMPSCI 201: Architecture and Assembly Language (E)

Professor: Graham

Lecture, discussion, lab. The architecture and machine-level operations of modern computers at the logic, component, and system levels. Topics include integer, scaled, and floating point binary arithmetic; Boolean algebra and logic gates; control, arithmetic-logic, and pipeline units; addressing modes; cache, primary, and virtual memory; system buses; input-output and interrupts. Simple assembly language for a modern embedded processor is used to explore how common computational tasks are accomplished by a computer. Two lectures, one discussion, and one lab session per week. Laboratory exercises, homework exercises, in-class quizzes, two midterm exams, and a final exam. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 187 or ECE 242 or equivalent. Comment on Lab 1: Students registering for CMPSCI H01 must register for Lab 1. 4 credits.

CMPSCI 250: Introduction to Computation (E)

Professor: O Neill

Lecture, discussion. Basic concepts of discrete mathematics useful to computer science: set theory, strings and formal languages, propositional and predicate calculus, relations and functions, basic number theory. Induction and recursion: interplay of inductive definition, inductive proof, and recursive algorithms. Elementary combinatorics. Finite-state machines, regular languages, nondeterministic finite automata, Kleene's Theorem. Problem sets, 2-3 midterm exams, timed final. Corequisite: MATH 132/136 or equivalent. Prerequisite: MATH 131 and (CMPSCI 187 or ECE 242). 4 credits.

CMPSCI 287: Programming Language Paradigms

Professor: Lehnert

Lecture, discussion, programming projects, lab. Programming language paradigms provide a basic philosophy to support the construction of reliable large-scale systems. This course discusses four such paradigms. In the functional paradigm, software is constructed in such a way as to minimize the use of side-effects, thereby simplifying the conceptual structure of programs and making them easier to analyze and understand. The logic paradigm supports the development of software in which the concept of relation (e.g. a relation between people) is more important than the concept of function. In the imperative paradigm we are concerned with principled ways in which software that is state-dependent can be constructed. Finally, in the object-oriented paradigm we are concerned with combining data with code to create "objects" which exhibit behavior. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 187 or ECE 242. Corequisites: CMPSCI 250 and MATH 132. 4 credits.

CMPSCI 305: Social Issues in Computing

Professor: Constantine

Designed to satisfy the Junior Year writing requirement, CMPSCI 305 introduces the student to technical writing and editing, scientific journalism and the social essay. The course combines practical, scientific writing as found in industry and business with explorative essays that focus attention upon the technological and humanistic concerns inherent in society. Ten written assignments-two longer papers, eight shorter ones and one oral presentation. Prerequisite: ENGLWP 112 or CW. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 311: Introduction to Algorithms

Professor: Barrington

This course will introduce you to algorithms in a variety of areas of interest, such as sorting, searching, string-processing, and graph algorithms. You will learn to study the performance of various algorithms within a formal, mathematical framework. You will also learn how to design very efficient algorithms for many kinds of problems. There will be a few programming assignments as well to help you relate the empirical performance of an algorithm to theoretical predictions. Mathematical experience (as provided by CMPSCI 250) is required. You should also be able to program in Java (or some other closely related language). Prerequisite: CMPSCI 250 or MATH 455. 4 credits.

CMPSCI 320: Introduction to Software Engineering

Professor: Fisher

In this course, students learn and gain practical experience with software engineering principles and techniques. The practical experience centers on a semester-long team project in which a software development project is carried through all the stages of the software life cycle. Topics in this course include requirements analysis, specification, design, abstraction, programming style, testing, maintenance, communication, teamwork, and software project management. Particular emphasis is placed on communication and negotiation skills and on designing and developing mintainable software. Use of computer reuired. Several in class quizes, in-class presentations, major term project. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 287. 4 credits.

CMPSCI 377: Operating Systems

Professor: Berger

In this course we examine the important problems in operating system design and implementation. The operating system provides a well-known, convenient, and efficient interface between user programs and the bare hardware of the computer on which they run. The operating system is responsible for allowing resources (e.g., disks, networks, and processors) to be shared, providing common services needed by many different programs (e.g., file service, the ability to start or stop processes, and access to the printer), and protecting individual programs from one another. The course will start with a brief historical perspective of the evolution of operating systems over the last fifty years, and then cover the major components of most operating systems. This discussion will cover the tradeoffs that can be made between performance and functionality during the design and implementation of an operating system. Particular emphasis will be given to three major OS subsystems: process management (processes, threads, CPU scheduling, synchronization, and deadlock), memory management (segmentation, paging, swapping), file systems, and operating system support for distributed systems. Prerequisites: CMPSCI 187 and (CMPSCI 201 or ECE 232). 4 credits.

CMPSCI 383: Artificial Intelligence

Professor: Utgoff

The course explores state-space search as a basic building block for intelligent computer systems. The class discussion and the weekly homeworks are organized around three projects; shich in the past have been Free Cell, jigsaw puzzles, and Amazons (two person board game). In the final two weeks of the course, we survey a variety of traditional topics in building intelligent systems, showing how state-space search applies. There are weekly programming assignments, a midterm, and a final. There is no text; material is presented inclass, and made available on the class Web pages. Prerequisites: CMPSCI 250 and CMPSCI 287 and CMPSCI 311. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 391F: Seminar - Fundamentals of Graphic Communication

Professor: Woolf

This course provides an understanding of computer-based design and multimedia production. Basic concepts in the areas of graphic design, animation, video editing and object-oriented programming will be covered preparing students for more advanced studies in 2D and 3D animation and in multimedia programming. Course work consists mainly of several student projects, built incrementally as several smaller sub-projects. Each student s project will be presented via the World Wide Web and discussed in class. Students interaction is encouraged through peer reviews and in-class exercises. Topics include HTML, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), file transfer, designing and drawing characters, image formats/image compression for the web, modeling and animation.

CMPSCI 397B: Three-Dimensional Animation and Digital Editing

Professor: Woolf

This seminar is dedicated to the production of high quality 3-dimensional computer animation using graphics technology. For example, color 3-D objects are defined and manipulated, digitized images created and altered, and photo-realistic effects and animated sequences produced. Techniques are used to bend and twist shapes around objects or lines, to provide a variety of light and texture, and to trace over images including digitized pictures. The course is directed at production of an informative and approachable ten minute 3-dimensional animated piece. Using computer-generated graphical analogies as well as cartoon caricature, the video is designed to educate and entertain. The class does not have lab facilities for all students interested in this material and thus we limit the class to students who do well on the first assignment. This assignment will be graded and returned to students before the end of the Add/Drop period. Students are cordially invited to attend the first class, the first Tuesday/Thursday of the semester. At that time we will explain the course, what is expected of students and the entry condition. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 397C: Interactive Multimedia Production

Professor: Woolf

This course explores the potential of high quality interactive authoring tools to develop presentation and training systems. Programming languages within professional presentation and editing packages will be used to create systems capable of presenting graphics, animation, text, sound and music, based on the users requests. Students will learn how to define and manipulate classical techniques such as storyboarding, staging, and interactivity. The course will concentrate on state-of-the-art multimedia composition and presentation techniques and developing small individual projects. The class does not have lab facilities for all students interested in this material and thus we limit the class to students who do well on the first assignment. This assignment will be graded and returned to students before the end of the Add/Drop period. Students are cordially invited to attend the first class, the first Tuesday/Thursday of the semester. At that time we will explain the course, what is expected of students and the entry condition. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 551 (591x) - 3D Computer Animation and Digital Editing. Permission of the instructor required; contact: Beverly Woolf 545-4265. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 397D: Interactive Web Animation

Professor: Woolf

This course teaches basic animation for the Web, interactivity, color theory, design, action scripting, and transitions. Students maintain their own web sites and submit projects every 2 weeks in Flash. Individual as well as, a final project are required. Knowledge of basic Web development, e.g., HTML, Java Script. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 391F; CMPSCI 551 and CMPSCI 552 preferred. Permission of instructor is required. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 397E: Seminar - Character Animation

Professor: Woolf

This class focuses exclusively on character animation techniques. The goal is to attain proficiency in modeling, texturing and animation. Modeling topics include character modeling and bones, designing joints and creating chains with constraints for easy animation, facial modelling and lip sync, designing faces with economical splinage to simplify facial animation, breaking down voice tracks into phonemes and animating facial and body language to match the track. Animation topics include action andpose, timing, overlap, pacing, and simulating and exaggerating physical laws. Student will create their own final project or work in a small team. Prerequisites: CMPSCI 551 (591x)--3D Animation and Digital Editing or equivalent experience and a personal computer. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 403: Introduction to Robotics: Mechanics, Dynamics, and Control

Professor: Brock

This course covers the fundamentals of robotics from the perspective of a computer scientist. We will model robotic systems to understand their motion form a physical perspective, discuss methods of controlling a robotic system using a computer to perform a desired motion, and present a variety of methods to compute the motion necessary to accomplish a given task. The experimental section of this class will give students the opportunity to apply the material learned in class by programming small mobile robots. Prerequisites: calculus, linear algebra, and programming skills. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 410: Compiler Techniques

Professor: Moss

This course explores the basic problems in the translation of programming languages focusing on theory and common implementation techniques for compiling traditional block structured programming languages to produce assembly or object code for typical machines. The course involves a substantial laboratory project in which the student constructs a working compiler for a considerable subset of a realistic programming language. The lectures are augmented by an optional laboratory section that covers details of the programming language used to build the compiler, the operating system, the source language, and various tools. Use of computer required. Text: Crafting a Compiler in C, by Fischer and LeBlanc. Prerequisites: (CMPSCI 250 or MATH 455) and CMPSCI 377. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 445: Information Systems

Professor: Wileden

Introduction to database systems. File organization, database system architectures, data models, database design, relational systems, query optimization, recovery and concurrency control. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 287. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 445X: Information Systems

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 503: Embedded Systems

Professor: Fagg

Most computers in use in the world are embedded in a system whose primary purpose is not to interface with a human user, but instead is to achieve some process control objective. Devices varying from an aircraft like the Boeing 777 to VCR's and Microwave Ovens are absolutely dependent upon embedded processors for vital control functions. These computing applications do not require the same specifications as general purpose computational platforms, but are instead intimately related to a particular physical process. This course introduces tools necessary to design embedded computational applications. Each student will design and build an embedded control application as a member of a team. The course is heavily project-oriented (with a required lab) and discussions will include topics such as; (1) mechanisms, sensors, actuators and feedback systems, (2) analog and digital circuits, power amplifiers, signal processing, operational amplifiers, multiplexing, (3) I/O - A/D, D/A, and latching, serial and parallel interfaces, (4) signal processing/conditioning and (5) an introduction to real-time programming. There will be a 3 credit lecture and a 1 credit lab (required) in which a hands-on, team project for an embedded application will be constructed over the semester. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 520: Software Engineering: Synthesis and Development

Professor: Adrion

Software Engineering I: This course introduces students to the principal activities involved in developing high-quality software systems. The course stresses the use of defined, systematic processes in the creation of carefully defined and engineered software products. Among the topics covered are requirements analysis, software architecture, formal specification methods, process definition, software design methods, and test planning. Issues specific to the development of software by teams and groups will also be addressed. Students will be required to read selected papers from the literature and complete homework projects. This course focuses on synthesis activities and complements CMPSCI 521, which focuses on software analysis techniques. Students are encouraged to take both courses but may take either course independently. Students who sign up for 620 will be expected to do more comprehensive projects than those who sign up for 520. Prerequisites: CMPSCI 320 or consent of instructor. 3credits.

CMPSCI 520X: Software Engineering: Synthesis and Development

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 521X: Software Engineering: Analysis and Evaluation

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 530X: Programming Languages

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 535: Computer Architecture

Professor: Weems

The structure of digital computers is studied at several levels, from the basic logic level, to the component level, to the system level. Topics include: the design of basic components such as arithmetic units and registers from logic gates; the organization of basic subsystems such as the memory and I/O subsystems; the interplay between hardware and software in a computer system; the von Neumann architecture and its performance enhancements such as cache memory, instruction and data pipelines, coprocessors, and parallelism. Weekly assignments, semester project, 2 hours exams, final. Prerequisites: (CMPSCI 250 or MATH 455) and CMPSCI 377. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 551: Three-Dimensional Animation and Digital Editing

Professor: Woolf

This seminar is dedicated to the production of high quality 3-dimensional computer animation using graphics technology. For example, color 3-D objects are defined and manipulated, digitized images created and altered, and photo-realistic effects and animated sequences produced. Techniques are used to bend and twist shapes around objects or lines, to provide a variety of light and texture, and to trace over images including digitized pictures. The course is directed at production of an informative and approachable ten minute 3-dimensional animated piece. Using computer-generated graphical analogies as well as cartoon caricature, the video is designed to educate and entertain. The class does not have lab facilities for all students interested in this material and thus we limit the class to students who do well on the first assignment. This assignment will be graded and returned to students before the end of the Add/Drop period. Students are cordially invited to attend the first class, the first Tuesday/Thursday of the semester. At that time we will explain the course, what is expected of students and the entry condition. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 552: Interactive Multimedia Production

Professor: Woolf

This course explores the potential of high quality interactive authoring tools to develop presentation and training systems. Programming languages within professional presentation and editing packages will be used to create systems capable of presenting graphics, animation, text, sound and music, based on the users requests. Students will learn how to define and manipulate classical techniques such as storyboarding, staging, and interactivity. The course will concentrate on state-of-the-art multimedia composition and presentation techniques and developing small individual projects. The class does not have lab facilities for all students interested in this material and thus we limit the class to students who do well on the first assignment. This assignment will be graded and returned to students before the end of the Add/Drop period. Students are cordially invited to attend the first class, the first Tuesday/Thursday of the semester. At that time we will explain the course, what is expected of students and the entry condition. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 551 (591x) - 3D Computer Animation and Digital Editing. Permission of the instructor required; contact: Beverly Woolf 545-4265. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 553: Interactive Web Animation

Professor: Woolf

This course teaches basic animation for the Web, interactivity, color theory, design, action scripting, and transitions. Students maintain their own web sites and submit projects every 2 weeks in Flash. Individual as well as, a final project are required. Knowledge of basic Web development, e.g., HTML, Java Script. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 391F; CMPSCI 551 and CMPSCI 552 preferred. Permission of instructor is required. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 570: Computer Vision

Professor: ** Section Deleted

People are able to infer the characteristics of a scene or object from an image of it. In this course, we will study what is involved in building artificial systems which try to infer such characteristics from an image. Topics include: Basics of image formation - the effect of geometry, viewpoint, lighting and albedo on image formation. Basic image operations such as filtering, convolution and correlation. Frequency representations of images. The importance of scale in images. Measurements of image properties such as color, texture, appearance and shape. Inference of motion and structure from moving objects and images. Detecting and recognizing objects in images. The graduate version CMPSCI 670(691A) requires more work than this version of the course. Prerequisite: Linear algebra, calculus and an ability to program. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 591EX: Computer Networking

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 591F: Seminar - Software Engineering Management Practicum

Professor: Fisher

The purpose of this course is to provide students with practical experience in the management of software development projects. Students in this course will gain this experience by serving as software development team technical managers for teams of software engineering students in CMPSCI 320. As project managers, the students in CMPSCI 591F will be responsible for: supervising and managing the work of teams of CMPSCI 320 students; interfacing with the other CMPSCI 591F students managing other teams in the course; interfacing with the course instructor, course TA, and course customer. CMPSCI 591F students will be assigned readings in software engineering project management to provide a theoretical basis for their work in this course. But the majority of work in the course will be related to the actual management of assigned development teams. As team managers, CMPSCI 591F students will set goals and schedules for their teams, track and report team progress, negotiate with leaders of other teams and the course customer, and evaluate the work of members of their teams. CMPSCI 591F course assignments may include: written team goals, plans and schedules; periodic reports on team progress; documentation of agreements reached with other team leaders and customers; evaluations of the applicability of theoretical papers to the work of this course. This course will meet at the same times and places as CMPSCI 320. Additional meetings with team members and other students in CMPSCI 591F are also expected to be arranged by mutual agreement. Enrollment in this course is only by permission of the instructor, and is restricted to students who have previously taken CMPSCI 320, and received a grade of A or AB. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 591G: Seminar - Computer Networking Lab

Professor: Kurose

In this course, students will learn how to put "principles into practice," in a hands-on-networking lab course. The course will cover router and end-system labs in the areas of Single Segment IP Networks, Multiple Segment IP Networks and Static Routing, Dynamic Routing Protocols (RIP and OSPF) LAN switching, Transport Layer Protocols: UDP and TCP, IP Multicast, NAT, DHCP, DNS, SNMP and Network Security. These labs will be done in a networked lab setting consisting of 4 routers, 4 hubs, and 4 end systems. See http://www-net.cs.umass.edu/cs591_fall03 for specific lab content. Prerequisites: Successful completion of CMPSCI 453 and permission of instructor.

CMPSCI 591O: Seminar - Character Animation

Professor: Woolf

This class focuses exclusively on character animation techniques. The goal is to attain proficiency in modeling, texturing and animation. Modeling topics include character modeling and bones, designing joints and creating chains with constraints for easy animation, facial modelling and lip sync, designing faces with economical splinage to simplify facial animation, breaking down voice tracks into phonemes and animating facial and body language to match the track. Animation topics include action andpose, timing, overlap, pacing, and simulating and exaggerating physical laws. Student will create their own final project or work in a small team. Prerequisites: CMPSCI 551 (591x)--3D Animation and Digital Editing or equivalent experience and a personal computer. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 591T: Seminar - Introduction to Algorithmics

Professor: Rosenberg

This course will introduce the methodology and "culture" of algorithmic reasoning and techniques of analysis. The emphasis will be on understanding rather than just learning. The specific topics to be covered and the method of covering them will be geared to the needs of the enrollees. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 596A: Independent Study - TA for CMPSCI 551 3D Animation

Professor: Woolf

TAs are responsible for developing student assignments weekly and for group grading assignments every two weeks. They typically give one lecture per semester and also spend 6 hours/week in the Animation Lab assisting students. TAs setup and maintain hardware and software needed for lectures - 3 or 4 commercial graphics packages. TAs take a lead role in the final course production, a group effort of 6-8 weeks work. Each TA manages 4-5 students organized in groups for 1) character animation, 2) lighting, 3) special effects, 4) surfaces, and 5) editing. The TA creates weekly tasks for each student in his/her group and makes sure that the work is complete and passed along to the next group on time. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 551 with grade of B or better. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 596B: Independent Study - TA for CMPSCI 552 Interactive Multimedia Production

Professor: Woolf

TAs are responsible for developing student assignments weekly and for group grading of assignments every two weeks. They typically give one lecture per semester, plus spend 6 hours/week in the Animation Lab assisting students. Setup/maintain hardware and software needed for lectures - 1 or 2 commercial graphics packages in addition to Director. Also setup and maintain an internet site into which students put their class assignments. Work with students on individual Director final projects; maintaincommuniction between 12-15 students, intstructors and TAs. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 552 with grade of B or better. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 596C: Independent Study - TA for CMPSCI 591O Seminar-Character Animation

Professor: Woolf

TAs are responsible for providing assistance to the instructor and students of CMPSCI 591O Seminar-Character Animation. Activities will include critiquing students work and providing useful feedback. Grading the class projects and homework assignments, and spending at least 6 hours each week in the laboratory to help the students with their daily work for the class. Evaluation will be done by the instructor based upon the quality of assistance to the students, attendance at the lectures and hours spent in the animation laboratory. Grading will also be based on advanced projects by the student and presented at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 591O with grade of B or better. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 596D: Independent Study - Advanced Computer Modeling

Professor: Woolf

This course focuses on production of high quality models, beginning with simple vases, desks, lamps and moving to character and humanoids. Students will model organic shapes, such as fruit, using splines, lathes, and extrudes. Surfacing topics such as specularity, reflection, trasparency, glow, decals and image maps will be discussed and modeled. Texture and advanced lighting techniques will be developed. Students will develop humanoid characters, modeling torso, shoulders, pelvis, arms, legs and hands feet and eyeballs. Geometry bones will be added to the final characters along with kinematic constraints and Euler Limits. The character's face will "lip sync" to speak or sing. Students will also create low patch proxy models of their characters to be used for blocking and simple motion within a final animation. These characters will be rigged for animation and the models given to students in the Animation Class for creation of the final project. Students will complete five independent modeling assignments and a final project in which their characters are animated by the Animation Class. The class does not have lab facilities for all students interested in this material and thus we limit the class to students who do well on the first assignment. This assignment will be graded and returned to students before the end of the Add/Drop period. Students are cordially invited to attend the first class, the first Tuesday/Thursday of the semester. At that time we will explain the course, what is expected of students and the entry condition. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 601X: Theory of Computation

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 610: Compiler Techniques

Professor: Moss

This course explores the basic problems in the translation of programming languages focusing on theory and common implementation techniques for compiling traditional block structured programming languages to produce assembly or object code for typical machines. The course involves a substantial laboratory project in which the student constructs a working compiler for a considerable subset of a realistic programming language. The lectures are augmented by an optional laboratory section that covers details of the programming language used to build the compiler, the operating system, the source language, and various tools. Use of computer required. Text: Crafting a Compiler in C, by Fischer and LeBlanc. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 377 or 402. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 611: Advanced Algorithms

Professor: Adler

Principles underlying the design and analysis of efficient algorithms. Topics to be covered include: divide-and-conquer algorithms, graph algorithms, matroids and greedy algorithms, randomized algorithms, NP-completeness, approximation algorithms, linear programming. Prerequisites: The mathematical maturity expected of incoming Computer Science graduate students, knowledge of algorithms at the level of CMPSCI 311. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 611X: Advanced Algorithms

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 620: Advanced Software Engineering: Synthesis and Development

Professor: Adrion

Software Engineering I: This course introduces students to the principal activities involved in developing high-quality software systems. The course stresses the use of defined, systematic processes in the creation of carefully defined and engineered software products. Among the topics covered are requirements analysis, software architecture, formal specification methods, process definition, software design methods, and test planning. Issues specific to the development of software by teams and groups will also be addressed. Students will be required to read selected papers from the literature and complete homework projects. This course focuses on synthesis activities and complements CMPSCI 521, which focuses on software analysis techniques. Students are encouraged to take both courses but may take either course independently. Students who sign up for 620 will be expected to do more comprehensive projects, that emphasize critical and analytic thinking, than those who sign up for 520. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 620X: Advanced Software Engineering: Synthesis and Development

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 621X: Advanced Software Engineering: Analysis and Evaluation

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 646: Information Retrieval

Professor: Allan

The course will cover basic and advanced techniques for text-based information systems. Topics covered include retrieval models, indexing and text representation, browsing and query formulation, routing, distributed information retrieval, and integration with database systems. The course will include implementation of major elements of an information retrieval system. Prerequisite: CMPSCI 445 or equivalent. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 646X: Information Retrieval

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 653: Computer Networking

Professor: Kurose

This course covers advanced fundamental principles of computer networks, studying foundational material in the field. Topics include protocol mechanisms and implementation principles, protocol specification/verification techniques, network algorithmics, advanced network architecture, network simulation, performance analysis, and measurement. Prerequisites: introductory (undergraduate level) courses in computer networks (e.g., CMPSCI 453/591,), operating systems (e.g., CMPSCI 377), and algorithms (e.g., CMPSCI 311). Some familiarity with probability will also be needed. 3 Credits.

CMPSCI 670: Computer Vision

Professor: ** Section Deleted

People are able to infer the characteristics of a scene or object from an image of it. In this course, we will study what is involved in building artificial systems which try to infer such characteristics from an image. Topics include: Basics of image formation - the effect of geometry, viewpoint, lighting and albedo on image formation. Basic image operations such as filtering, convolution and correlation. Frequency representations of images. The importance of scale in images. Measurements of image properties such as color, texture, appearance and shape. Inference of motion and structure from moving objects and images. Detecting and recognizing objects in images. This course is the graduate version of CMPSCI 570(591A) and it requires more work compared to the undergraduate version CMPSCI 570(591A). Prerequisite: Linear algebra, calculus and an ability to program. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 677X: Operating Systems

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 683: Artificial Intelligence

Professor: Zilberstein

In-depth introduction to Artificial Intelligence focusing on techniques that allow intelligent systems to operate in real-time and cope with missing information, uncertainty, and limited computational resources. Topics include: advanced search and problem-solving techniques, resource-bounded search, principles of knowledge representation and reasoning, meta-reasoning, reasoning under uncertainty, Bayesian networks and influence diagrams, decision theory and the value of information, planning and scheduling, intelligent agents architectures, and learning. Prerequisites: Undergraduate background in Computer Science, and an undergraduate Artificial Intelligence course (CMPSCI 383 or equivalent). 3 credits.

CMPSCI 683X: Artificial Intelligence

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 687: Reinforcement Learning

Professor: Barto, Mc Govern

A comprehensive introduction to reinforcement learning, an approach to artificial intelligence emphasizing learning from interaction to achieve goals in stochastic environments. The focus is on algorithms that learn what actions to take so as to optimize long-term performance. The course covers Markov decision processes, dynamic programming, temporal-difference learning, Monte Carlo learning methods, eligibility traces, the role of neural networks, and the integration of learning and planning. Prerequisites: Basic probability theory and programming skills. A prior course in artificial intelligence is recommended. STATIS 515 and CMPSCI 287 and CMPSCI 383 or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 689: Machine Learning: Pattern Classification

Professor: Mahadevan

Machine learning is the study of computational methods of making statistically reliable inferences from data. This is the first in a planned two-course sequence of graduate-level courses in machine learning. This course uses graphical models as a unifying formalism, which provide a compact way of representing probability distributions, by exploiting domain knowledge to factor complex dependencies among variables. "Learning" is viewed as maximum likelihood inference over data generated by sampling from an unknown model. Course topics: detailed introduction to graphical models, maximum likelihood and Bayes density estimation, expectation maximization (EM), regression methods including support vector machines, decision trees and neural networks; time-series graphical models, including dynamic Bayes networks and hidden Markov models; approximate inference methods, including MCMC and variational methods; state of the art applications, including bioinformatics, text retrieval, robotics, and vision. The class is recommended not only for students who plan to major in artificial intelligence (AI), but also students from other areas whose research calls for modeling complex systems with underlying statistical variability. Prior exposure to machine learning through an undergraduate (or graduate) course in AI is helpful, but not required. A good undergraduate knowledge of probability and statistics is definitely desirable. There will be reading assignments, written exercises, programming exercises, a midterm, a final exam, and a group project. Prerequisites: basic probability and linear algebra; computer programming ability. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 691FX: Programming Languages

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 691G: Seminar-Computer Networking

Professor: ** Section Deleted

CMPSCI 691M: Seminar - Mobile and Pervasive Computing

Professor: Corner

Wireless communication has brought us to a new era: mobile and pervasive computing. This world is not without complications: oases of connectivity, highly variable bandwidth and latency, dynamic network topologies, limited battery power, and easily snooped communications. It has also opened vast arenas of new applications such as sensor networks and location-based services. This seminar will examine these topics from a software systems perspective. It will contain components of networking, however it will mostly deal with the broader aspects of mobile and pervasive computing. Students will critically examine classic and cutting edge papers from Mobicom, SOSP, OSDI, and others. A moderate sized group project will be required. 3 Credits.

CMPSCI 691N: Seminar - Statistical Object Recognition and Image Retrieval

Professor: Manmatha

Object recognition is a difficult problem and much effort has gone into it over the years. In recent years, statistical techniques are beginning to have some success in tackling this problem and the re-lated problem of image retrieval. While some of these techniques were first developed in the context of images, there has also been some ross-fertilization from other fields such as machine learning, information retrieval, machine translation and optical character recognition. Students will read and discuss papers on some of the statistical approaches that researchers have applied to give them a good idea of the whats happening in this area and the possibilities. Papers on interesting statistical methods which have been applied in other areas and papers on feature detection may also be part of the reading list. Students will be expected to present papers in rotation and to participate in the discussion in the class. The course may also require a project.

CMPSCI 691O: Seminar - Tools for Explanatory and Tutoring Systems

Professor: Woolf

This seminar examines recent work in explanatory and tutoring systems. We will explore research issues in: Collaboratory Environments, Dialogue Systems, Machine Learning, Teaching Strategies Simulators, Authoring Tools and User Models. The objective of the course is to stimulate awareness of research issues and to promote sound analytic and design skills as they pertain to building knowledge representations and control strategies. Relevant topics and applications will be presented through readings in the recent literature. Each student will prepare written critiques of each paper, lead several in-class discussions and prepare appropriate questions about the research. Several working systems will be available for hands-on critique. Readings for the course are contained in several bound volumes of articles and technical reports available in the main CMPSCI office. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 691P: Software Systems Seminar

Professor: ** Section Deleted

Modern software systems are brittle. Unanticipated workloads, like "the Slashdot effect", bring most applications to their knees. In this seminar, we'll examine and develop systems-based approaches to making robust software that performs well regardless of workload, architecture, or data access patterns.

CMPSCI 691RX: Performance Evaluation

Professor:

PEEAS course.

CMPSCI 691S: Seminar - Changing Challenges in Collaborative Algorithmics

Professor: Rosenberg

Collaborative algorithmics is the study of computing agents cooperating in the solution of a single computational problem. When the field began, roughly 25 years ago, the relevant platforms were shared-memory multiprocessors. Since then, the "hot action" has shifted, in turn, to: * message-passing multiprocessors; * clusters, a/k/anetworks of "workstations" (both custom, usually homogeneous ones, and commodity, usually heterogeneous ones); * clusters of clusters of ... of clusters; * Internet computing in its various guises: - Grid computing; - peer-to-peer computing; - web-based computing Each change in technology has brought with it new algorithmic challenges that require new algorithmic concepts and paradigms. By reviewing portions of the relevant literature, this seminar will survey the changing world of Collaborative Algorithmics. Pre-requisites: Graduate level algorithmic sophistication. Eligibility: Graduate students only. 3 Credits.

CMPSCI 691T: Seminar - Computational Social Network Analysis

Professor: Jensen, McCallum

Social Network Analysis is the study of relationships among social entities, such as communications among members of a group, economic transactions between corporations, and treaties among nations. Interest is this field is blossoming as traditional practitioners in the social and behavioral sciences are being joined by researchers from statistics, graph theory, machine learning and data mining. In this course we will survey the field of Social Network Analysis from a computational point of view, with a focus on practical applications and open avenues for further research.

CMPSCI 691U: Seminar - Artificial Neural Development

Professor: Utgoff

CMPSCI 701: Advanced Computer Science Topics

Professor: Staff

This is a 6 credit reading course corresponding to the master s project. The official instructor is the GPD although the student does the work with and is evaluated by the readers of his or her master s project.

CMPSCI 791G: Seminar - Computational Geometry and Applications

Professor: Streinu

Geometric algorithms lie at the heart of many modern applications, ranging from Graphics and Robotics to Protein Modelling. This half-course / half-seminar is - in its first part - an introduction into the main techniques of Computational Geometry (convex hulls, triangulations, Voronoi diagrams, visibility, art gallery problems, motion planning and rigidity-based protein structure investigation). The second part will be devoted to some current research problems (of a theoretical or applied nature), mostly related to the mathematical and computational aspects of protein structure design, protein structure prediction and protein folding, and will offer opportunities to explore several potential research projects emerging from these topics. If time allows, I'd also like to include some of the available software technologies available for working with geometric problems (such as the LEDA and CGAL libraries). Requirements: class participation, a few problem sets in the beginning, taking class notes, presenting one paper and/or a final project (paper of small programming). Prerequisite: Mathematical maturity. Eligibility: Graduate students only. Others with permission of instructor. 3 credits.

CMPSCI 791J: Active Decision Support System

Professor: ** Section Deleted

CMPSCI 791L: Seminar - Sensor Networks

Professor: Kurose

Sensor networks are a sensing, computing and communication infrastructure that allows us to instrument, observe, and respond to phenomena in the natural environment, and in our physical and cyber infrastructure. The sensors themselves can range from small passive microsensors (e.g, "smart dust") to larger scale, controllable weather-sensing platforms. Their computation and communication infrastructure will be radically different from that found in today's Internet-based systems, reflecting the device- and application-driven nature of these systems. In this seminar, we will survey the current sensor nets literature, focusing on the communication and computational challenges posed by these systems. Throughout the semester, we'll look to identify open research challenges and directions. This course can be taken for either 1 credit or 3 credits. In the latter case, a semester project will be required. Prerequisites include previous courses in computer networks and operating systems at the undergraduate level. Approval of the instructors is required to register for this seminar.

CMPSCI 791R: Seminar - Computational Appraches to Biological Oscillations and Clocks

Professor: Siegelmann

This seminar will consider bioinformatic and neurobiological approaches to biological clocks, with an emphasis on how computer and biological networks can generate reliable rhythms which synchronize with one another and with the environment. Topics will include: 1. internal oscillations of behavioral and physiological functions 2. the mechanisms of their synchronization (entrainment) 3. distributed algorithms for creating synchronized clocks from asynchronous components 4. reaching concensus about phase and period among distributed oscillators 5. modeling a system that integrates cues and sends executive messages to generate rhythmicity 6. how the brain's master oscillator works 7. our current understanding of the molecular basis of circadian clocks 8. the body as a population of master and slave oscillators. Students will be assigned weekly readings and will present a semester project based on their search of the literature and/or computer simulations. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in computer science, neuroscience and behavior, or other appropriate field, or consent of the instructors.

CMPSCI 891M: Theory of Computation

Professor: Adler

The theory seminar is a weekly meeting in which topics of interest in the theory of computation - broadly construed - are presented. This is sometimes new research by visitors or local people. It is sometimes work in progress, and it is sometimes recent material of others that some of us present in order to learn and share.

CMPSCI 899: PhD Dissertation

Professor:

CMPSCI H01: Honors Colloquium for CMPSCI 201

Professor: Graham

Several topics are explored in more depth than is possible in the CMPSCI 201 lectures and discussions. Assigned readings are explored in the colloquium's weekly meeting. Students do one or more projects using an Intel I86 based computer, such as the IBM PC. These projects require application of the material discussed in both CMPSCI 201 and the colloquium. Students can choose their own projects, with the instructor's approval. A significant degree of independent effort on the students part is expected. Grades are based on written reports, participation in H01 discussions, and the application of the concepts studied by colloquium in the design and implementaion of the projects. Registration in CMPSCI 201 is required. 1 credit

CMPSCI H02: Honors Colloquium for CMPSCI 445

Professor: Wileden

Practical issues of database design, implementation or application. Students will complete a project that complements or substantially extends the project that is part of the CMPSCI 445 class. Where appropriate, students will browse and discuss current related research. Individual projects and group discussion are the criteria for grading/evaluation. 1 credit.

CMPSCI H03: Honors Colloquium for CMPSCI 320

Professor: Fisher

In this course, students learn and gain practical experience with software engineering principles and techniques. The practical experience centers on a semester-long team project in which a software development project is carried through all the stages of the software life cycle. Honors students will be expected to assume responsibility for some of the more complex aspects of the project as well as to study more advanced concepts. 1 credit.

CMPSCI H04: Honors Colloquium for CMPSCI 311

Professor: Barrington

Students will meet weekly with the instructor to discuss additional topics related to the study of algorithms. These might include lower bound arguments, dynamic complexity, or parallel algorithms. There will be a few additional problem sets and an in-class presentation by each student. 1 credit.

CMPSCI H05: Honors Colloquium for CMPSCI 535

Professor: Weems

The honors section of CMPSCI 535 provides an opportunity for University Honors students enrolled in the class to take a deeper look at some aspect of computer architecture or its underlying technology. The specific choice of topics is agreed upon by the instructor and student on an individual basis. Students may choose to explore the history of some aspect of architecture or technology, look at market influences on the science and engineering of computer hardware, experiment with a novel computer design through simulation, conduct a series of in-depth readings leading to a semester thesis, or other suitable work done under regular consultation with the instructor. Recommended for Juniors, Seniors; Majors. 1 credit.

CMPSCI 453: Computer Networks

Professor: Bradshaw

This course provides an introduction to fundamental concepts in the design and implementation of computer communication networks, their protocols, and applications. Topics to be covered include: layered network architectures, applications, network programming interfaces (e.g., sockets), transport, congestion, routing, and data link protocols, local area networks, emerging high-speed networks, network management, and network security. Examples will be drawn primarily from the Internet (e.g., TCP, UDP, and IP) protocol suite. There will be written assignments, programming assignments (in C), one midterm, and a final exam. Prerequisites: A rudimentary understanding of computer architecture and operating systems, while not required, would be helpful. 3 credits.


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